Kaitieki o Ngati Maru, Ngati Kaipoho, Ngai Tawhiri, Ngati Ruapani ki Turanga

Library

Tena koe,

The Rongowhakaata Library is a work in progress. We acknowledge firstly the contribution of Ta Henare Ngata and his presentation for the Rongawhakaata Waitangi Day celebrations in 2004. All the research reports were commissioned by Rongowhakaata for our Waitangi Tribunal Hearings.

Content

Henare Ngata Waitangi Day Address, 2004

Rongowhakaata and the Crown, 1840–1873

Rongowhakaata Socio Economic Review – 1850 to 2000

Rongowhakaata and the Native Land Court 1873-1900

Rongowhakaata Traditional History Reports

Turanga Manu Whiri – Customary interests outside the Gisborne Enquiry District, Rongowhakaata, Te Aitanga Mahaki and Ngariki Kaiputahi

Ecological impacts and planning history – An Enviromental History of the Turanganui a Kiwa case book

Gisborne Harbour Board and the Development of Port Gisborne

Rangahaua Whanui District 5B – Poverty Bay


Henare Ngata Waitangi Day Address, 2004

HK Ngata Waitangi Day Address


Rongowhakaata and the Crown, 1840–1873

By Bruce Stirling, Historian

Although the Crown proclaimed sovereignty over New Zealand in 1840, its practical authority over Turanga, and over Rongowhakaata, remained nominal for several decades. Representatives of Rongowhakaata and other Turanga iwi did sign the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840 but the full import of the Treaty – at least as the Crown interpreted it – was not apparent on the ground in Turanga for another quarter-century, and until 1865 Rongowhakaata and other Turanga iwi essentially retained their customary authority over their lands and their lives.

This authority – or rangatiratanga – had enabled them to adapt to and benefit from the innovations introduced by their Pakeha guests, who arrived in small numbers from the 1830s onwards, and it also enabled them to control how such innovations were brought into their world. However, this authority, and Rongowhakaata’s renowned independence of mind, was anathema to the Crown, which was prepared to go to great lengths to enforce its writ in Turanga. When the blandishments of Native Land Purchase Commissioner McLean failed, and when the judicial edifice constructed by Resident Magistrate Wardell proved hollow, overwhelming military force and siege warfare proved capable of establishing the Crown’s sovereignty over Turanga. Afterwards, Turanganui, the nascent township of the subjugated district, was symbolically renamed Gisborne, but transforming Rongowhakaata was not so easy.

Rongowhakaata and the Crown

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Rongowhakaata Socio Economic Review – 1850 to 2000

By Tony Wazl, Historian

This report has been compiled to provide an overview of socio-economic issues as they pertain to Rongowhakaata Iwi over the period 1850 to 2000. The aim of this report is to extract analysis on how the events and themes described in other Rongowhakaata commissioned reports on land issues, socio – economic influences with impacted on the tribe.  The information utilised is not intended to provide a full comprehensive record of all socio economic issues and indicators to Rongowhakaata, but instead to present the main attributes of their socio-economic experience to identify and encapsulate the experience which impacted on most Iwi members.

Please contact us to access this document.


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Rongowhakaata and the Native Land Court 1873-1900

by Fiona Small and Phillip Cleaver (Historians)

The primary focus of this report is the individualisation of not just the land but also the Rongowhakaata community, one result of which was a loss of collective knowledge and memory.

Rongowhakaata and the Native Land Court 1873-1900

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Rongowhakaata Traditional History Reports

Table of Contents – please use the table of content to find specific information that you may be interested in or as a guide to give you an overview of what is contained in the following reports

Rongowhakaata Traditional History Report table of contents

Rongowhakaata Traditional History Report p1-20

Rongowhakaata Traditional History Report p21-40

Rongowhakaata Traditional History Report p41-60

Rongowhakaata Traditional History Report p61-80

Rongowhakaata Traditional History Report p81-100

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Turanga Manu Whiri – Customary interests outside the Gisborne Enquiry District, Rongowhakaata, Te Aitanga Mahaki and Ngariki Kaiputahi

By Richard Towers, Historian

The project brief for this report specifies the following work;

The nature of customary or traditional interests in each block

How Tribal interests in these areas were established and maintained

The nature of historic relationships with neighbouring Hapu and Iwi

The contractor examined the nature and extent of Rongowhakaata’s customary interests including; lands, resources and sites of significance north and west of the Gisborne Inquiry district including Kaiti, Pouawa and Hangaroa Matawai.

Richard Towers – TMW Customary Interests Report Nov 2008 

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Ecological impacts and planning history – An Enviromental History of the Turanganui a Kiwa case book

by Dr Brad Coombes, Geography Dept, Auckland University

This report concentrates on environmental transformation rather than an account of the historical and present resources of the Turanga district, also it endeavours to compliment the Rongowhakaata traditional history report.

Objectives being;

  • To evaluate the transformation or despoilment of important resource spaces
  • Ascertain the extent to which Treaty principles have influenced the management of resource spaces of importance to Maori

Please contact us to access this document.

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Gisborne Harbour Board and the Development of Port Gisborne

by Stephen Oliver, Historian

The established lands of the Gisborne Harbour were occupied pre European settlement by Te Aitanga Hauiti, Te Aitanga Mahaki and Rongowhakaata. The development of the Harbour involved much debate, controversy and considerable expense to rate payers. The Harbour development involved the taking of land from Maori using the public works act. The Gisborne Harbour Board may have in it’s historical records breached the conditions or at least spirit of the Treaty of Waitangi in several ways.These are that it may have failed to consult adequately with Maori, that it may have taken Maori land when it could have taken European land, and that it kept taken for harbour works after the land was no longer needed for that purpose.

Gisborne Harbour Development of Port Gisborne – Oliver 2000

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Rangahaua Whanui District 5B – Poverty Bay

by Sian Daly, Historian

This report is one of a series of district reports commissioned by the Waitangi Tribunal as part of it Rangahaua Whanui project which was designed to provide basic material on the causes and impact of land and resource within an historical context;

  • Giving an overview of the wide ranging issues common to claimants in a specific geographical area and
  • Provide historical review of Crown policy and actions.

Rangahaua Whanui District 5B Poverty Bay

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